The Atomium, Brussels, Belgium

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Visiting the peculiar giant metal molecule is one of the most popular things to do in Brussels.

The Atomium is a landmark building in Brussels, originally constructed for the 1958 Brussels World’s Fair. It is located on the Heysel Plateau in Laeken, where the exhibition took place. The Atomium symbolizes an iron crystal that has been magnified 165 billion times. It refers to the power of nuclear energy that was peacefully used in 1958.

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St. Michael and St. Gudula Cathedral, Brussels, Belgium

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The Cathedral of St Michael and St Gudula (Cathédrale Saint-Michel et Sainte-Gudule) is one of the most important landmarks in Brussels. It was built in a Gothic style at the beginning of the thirteenth century on the foundations of a Romanesque church established in the eleventh century. The actual cathedral took 300 hundred years to complete. It is perfectly conserved because between 1983 and 1989 it was completely restored.
The church was given cathedral status in 1962 and has since been the co-cathedral of the Archdiocese of Mechelen-Brussels, together with St. Rumbold’s Cathedral in Mechelen.

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Parc du Cinquantenaire, Brussels, Belgium

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The Parc du Cinquantenaire or Jubelpark is not only a park but a national landmark in Brussels. The name means ‘Park of the fiftieth anniversary’ and it was built during the reign of Leopold II to commemorate fifty years of Belgian independence. Symbolically, the Cinquantenaire Park in Brussels is built in the shape of a pentagon, like the inner and outer rings of the city. Cinquantenaire sits just outside the inner circle, and is close to the European Quarter.

Today, the various buildings of the Cinquantenaire host three museums—the Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History, the Art & History Museum and Autoworld.

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Brussels, Belgium*

About Brussels


The City of Brussels is the largest municipality and historical centre of the Brussels-Capital Region, and the de jure capital of Belgium. Historically Dutch-speaking, Brussels saw a language shift to French from the late 19th century. The Brussels-Capital Region is officially bilingual in French and Dutch, even though French is now the de facto main language with over 90% of the population speaking it. Brussels is known for its cuisine and gastronomy, as well as its historical and architectural landmarks; some of them are registered as UNESCO World Heritage sites. Main attractions include its historic Grand Place, Manneken Pis and the Atomium. It is also a capital of the comic strip.

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