Helsinki Cathedral, Helsinki, Finland

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The Helsinki Cathedral is located in the neighborhood of Kruununhaka in the centre of Helsinki, Finland at the Senate Square. The Cathedral was originally built from 1830–1852 as a tribute to the Grand Duke of Finland, Tsar Nicholas I of Russia.

The Cathedral was also known as St Nicholas’s Church until the independence of Finland in 1917. It is a major landmark of the city, and possibly the most famous structure in Finland as a whole when viewed globally.

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St. Basil’s Cathedral, Moscow, Russia

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The Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed, commonly known as Saint Basil’s Cathedral, is an Orthodox church in Red Square of Moscow, and is one of the most popular cultural symbols of Russia.

St Basil’s Cathedral was completed in 1561 to celebrate Russian victory over the Khanate of Kazan. The cathedral was recognised as significant and irreplaceable national monument by the Soviets. It underwent extensive restoration and became a museum of architecture, history, politics, and religion.

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St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, England

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The St Paul’s Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in London. As the seat of the Bishop of London, the cathedral serves as the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London and is a Grade I listed building.

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Leaning Tower of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

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The Leaning Tower of Pisa or simply the Tower of Pisa is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation. Its exceptional nature isn’t due only to its peculiar inclination because, even if it didn’t lean, the Tower of Pisa would still be one of the most remarkable belltowers in Europe.

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St. Michael and St. Gudula Cathedral, Brussels, Belgium

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The Cathedral of St Michael and St Gudula (Cathédrale Saint-Michel et Sainte-Gudule) is one of the most important landmarks in Brussels. It was built in a Gothic style at the beginning of the thirteenth century on the foundations of a Romanesque church established in the eleventh century. The actual cathedral took 300 hundred years to complete. It is perfectly conserved because between 1983 and 1989 it was completely restored.
The church was given cathedral status in 1962 and has since been the co-cathedral of the Archdiocese of Mechelen-Brussels, together with St. Rumbold’s Cathedral in Mechelen.

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