Leaning Tower of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

What can you expect:

The Leaning Tower of Pisa or simply the Tower of Pisa is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation. Its exceptional nature isn’t due only to its peculiar inclination because, even if it didn’t lean, the Tower of Pisa would still be one of the most remarkable belltowers in Europe.

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Plitvice Lakes National Park, Lika-Senj County, Croatia

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Plitvice Lakes National Park is one of the oldest and largest national parks in Croatia. In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register. Located roughly halfway between capital city Zagreb and Zadar on the coast, the lakes are a definite must-see in Croatia.

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Colosseum, Rome, Italy

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The Colosseum, is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy, just east of the Roman Forum and is the largest ancient amphitheatre ever built, and is still the largest standing amphitheater in the world today, despite its age.  It is an imposing construction that, with almost 2,000 years of history, will bring you back in time to discover the way of life in the Roman Empire.

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Neuschwanstein Castle, Schwangau, Germany

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Neuschwanstein Castle, in Germany, is one of the greatest castles in Europe – and one of the world’s foremost tourist attractions. Neuschwanstein was designed to be a hideaway for this reclusive king, as well as a palace evoking Medieval myth and fantasy. The cliff-edge setting of the Castle, provides the jaw-dropping, Alpine backdrop which makes the site picture-perfect. It was built in a time when castles were no longer necessary as strongholds, and, despite its romanticized medieval design, Louis also required it to have all the newest technological comforts.

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Eiffel Tower, Paris, France

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The Eiffel Tower has long been an icon of Paris and one of the first things that come to mind when people think of the city (even France). It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. It was designed for the Exposition Universelle, a world fair held in Paris in 1889. It is currently the most famous symbol of Paris.

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St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican City, Rome, Italy

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The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican, or simply Saint Peter’s Basilica, is a church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave that is within the city of Rome. The Basilica is one of the holiest temples for Christendom and one of the largest churches in the world.

St. Peter’s is famous as a place of pilgrimage and for its liturgical functions. The pope presides at a number of liturgies throughout the year both within the basilica or the adjoining St. Peter’s Square; these liturgies draw audiences numbering from 15,000 to over 80,000 people.

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St. Michael and St. Gudula Cathedral, Brussels, Belgium

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The Cathedral of St Michael and St Gudula (Cathédrale Saint-Michel et Sainte-Gudule) is one of the most important landmarks in Brussels. It was built in a Gothic style at the beginning of the thirteenth century on the foundations of a Romanesque church established in the eleventh century. The actual cathedral took 300 hundred years to complete. It is perfectly conserved because between 1983 and 1989 it was completely restored.
The church was given cathedral status in 1962 and has since been the co-cathedral of the Archdiocese of Mechelen-Brussels, together with St. Rumbold’s Cathedral in Mechelen.

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Brandenburg Gate, Berlin, Germany

What can you expect:

The Brandenburg Gate is one of the most important and well-known sights of the city and also the contemporary symbol of (reunited) Berlin. The Brandenburg Gate is the only old city gate (1788) in Berlin that is still standing and was placed in the Russian sector shortly after the Second World War. In 1961, the construction of the Berlin Wall started just behind the Brandenburg Gate.

It is located in the western part of the city centre of Berlin within Mitte, at the junction of Unter den Linden and Ebertstraße, immediately west of the Pariser Platz.

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